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  Cognitive Factors can Influence Self-Motion Perception (Vection) in Virtual Reality

Riecke, B., Schulte-Pelkum, J., Avraamides, M., von der Heyde, M., & Bülthoff, H. (2006). Cognitive Factors can Influence Self-Motion Perception (Vection) in Virtual Reality. ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, 3(3), 194-216. doi:10.1145/1166087.1166091.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D0CF-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-42A2-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Riecke, BE1, 2, Author              
Schulte-Pelkum, J1, 2, Author              
Avraamides, MN1, 2, Author              
von der Heyde, M1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Research on self-motion perception and simulation has traditionally focussed on the contribution of physical stimulus properties (bottom-up factors) using abstract stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cognitive (top-down) mechanisms like ecological relevance and presence evoked by a virtual environment can also enhance visually induced self-motion illusions (vection). In two experiments, naive observers were asked to rate presence and the onset, intensity, and convincingness of circular vection induced by different rotating visual stimuli presented on a curved projection screen (FOV: 54°×45°). Globally consistent stimuli depicting a natural 3D scene proved more effective in inducing vection and presence than inconsistent (scrambled) or unnatural (upside-down) stimuli with similar physical stimulus properties. Correlation analyses suggest a direct relationship between spatial presence and vection. We propose that the spatial reference frame evoked by the naturalistic environment increased the believability of the visual stimulus, such that it was more easily accepted as a stable scene with respect to which visual motion is more likely to be judged as self-motion than object-motion. This work extends our understanding of mechanisms underlying self-motion perception, and might thus help to improve the effectiveness and believability of Virtual Reality applications.

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 Dates: 2006-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 3767
DOI: 10.1145/1166087.1166091
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Title: ACM Transactions on Applied Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Association for Computing Machinery
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 194 - 216 Identifier: ISSN: 1544-3558
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111056648028200