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  Eye movements of monkey observers viewing vocalizing conspecifics

Ghazanfar, A., Nielsen, K., & Logothethis, N. (2006). Eye movements of monkey observers viewing vocalizing conspecifics. Cognition, 101(3), 515-529. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2005.12.007.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D30D-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-965B-D
Genre: Journal Article

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Ghazanfar, AA1, 2, Author              
Nielsen, KJ1, 2, Author              
Logothethis, NK1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Primates, including humans, communicate using facial expressions, vocalizations and often a combination of the two modalities. For humans, such bimodal integration is best exemplified by speech-reading – humans readily use facial cues to enhance speech comprehension, particularly in noisy environments. Studies of the eye movement patterns of human speech-readers have revealed, unexpectedly, that they predominantly fixate on the eye region of the face as opposed to the mouth. Here, we tested the evolutionary basis for such a behavioral strategy by examining the eye movements of rhesus monkeys observers as they viewed vocalizing conspecifics. Under a variety of listening conditions, we found that rhesus monkeys predominantly focused on the eye region versus the mouth and that fixations on the mouth were tightly correlated with the onset of mouth movements. These eye movement patterns of rhesus monkeys are strikingly similar to those reported for humans observing the visual components of speech. The data therefore suggest that the sensorimotor strategies underlying bimodal speech perception may have a homologous counterpart in a closely related primate ancestor.

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 Dates: 2006-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2005.12.007
BibTex Citekey: 3819
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Title: Cognition
  Other : Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 101 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 515 - 529 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-0277
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925391298