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  Scene Consistency and Spatial Presence Increase the Sensation of Self-Motion in Virtual Reality

Riecke, B., Schulte-Pelkum, J., Avraamides, M., von der Heyde, M., & Bülthoff, H. (2005). Scene Consistency and Spatial Presence Increase the Sensation of Self-Motion in Virtual Reality. In H. Bülthoff, & T. Troscianko (Eds.), APGV '05: 2nd Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization (pp. 111-118). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D4C9-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-463D-9
Genre: Conference Paper

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https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1080422 (Publisher version)
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 Creators:
Riecke, BE1, 2, Author              
Schulte-Pelkum, J1, 2, Author              
Avraamides, M, Author              
von der Heyde, M, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: The illusion of self-motion induced by moving visual stimuli ("vection") has typically been attributed to low-level, bottom-up perceptual processes. Therefore, past research has focused primarily on examining how physical parameters of the visual stimulus (contrast, number of vertical edges etc.) affect vection. Here, we investigated whether higher-level cognitive and top-down processes - namely global scene consistency and spatial presence - also contribute to the illusion. These factors were indirectly manipulated by presenting either a natural scene (the Tübingen market place) or various scrambled and thus globally inconsistent versions of the same stimulus. Due to the scene scrambling, the stimulus could no longer be perceived as a consistent 3D scene, which was expected to decrease spatial presence and thus impair vection. Twelve naive observers were asked to indicate the onset, intensity, and convincingness of circular vection induced by rotating visual stimuli presented on a curved projection screen (FOV: 54°x45°). Spatial presence was assessed using presence questionnaires. As predicted, scene scrambling impaired both vection and presence ratings for all dependent measures. Neither type nor severity of scrambling, however, showed any clear effect. The data suggest that higher-level information (the interpretation of the globally consistent stimulus as a 3D scene and stable reference frame) dominated over the low-level (bottom-up) information (more contrast edges in the scrambled stimuli, which are known to facilitate vection). Results suggest a direct relation between spatial presence and self-motion perception. We posit that stimuli depicting globally consistent, naturalistic scenes provide observers with a convincing spatial reference frame for the simulated environment which allows them to feel "spatially present" therein. We propose that this, in turn, increases the believability of the visual stimuli as a stable "scene" with respect to which visual motion is more likely to be judged as self-motion. We propose that not only low-level, bottom-up factors, but also higher-level factors such as the meaning of the stimulus are relevant for self-motion perception and should thus receive more attention. This work has important implications for both our understanding of selfmotion perception and motion simulator design and applications.

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 Dates: 2005-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1145/1080402.1080422
BibTex Citekey: 3467
 Degree: -

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Title: 2nd Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization (APGV 2005)
Place of Event: A Coroña, Spain
Start-/End Date: 2005-08-26 - 2005-08-28

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Title: APGV '05: 2nd Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Bülthoff, HH1, Editor            
Troscianko, T, Editor
Affiliations:
1 Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794            
Publ. Info: New York, NY, USA : ACM Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 111 - 118 Identifier: ISBN: 1-59593-139-2