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  Auditory cues can facilitate the visually-induced self-motion illusion (circular vection) in Virtual Reality

Riecke, B., Schulte-Pelkum, J., Caniard, F., & Bülthoff, H. (2005). Auditory cues can facilitate the visually-induced self-motion illusion (circular vection) in Virtual Reality. Poster presented at 8th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2005), Tübingen, Germany.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D62D-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-D6C9-8
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Riecke, BE1, 2, Author              
Schulte-Pelkum, J1, 2, Author              
Caniard, F1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: There is a long tradition of investigating the self-motion illusion induced by rotating visual stimuli ("circular vection"). Recently, Larsson et al. (2004)[1] showed that up to 50 of participants could also get some vection from rotating sound sources while blindfolded, replicating findings from Lackner (1977)[2]. Compared to the compelling visual illusion, though, auditory vection is rather weak and much less convincing. Here, we tested whether adding an acoustic landmark to a rotating visual photorealistic stimulus of a natural scene can improve vection. Twenty observers viewed rotating stimuli that were projected onto a curved projection screen (FOV: 54°x40.5°). The visual scene rotated around the earth-vertical axis at 30°/s. Three conditions were randomized in a repeated measures within-subject design: No-sound, mono-sound, and 3D-sound using a generic head-related transfer function (HRTF). Adding mono-sound showed only minimal tendencies towards increased vection and did not affect presence-ratings at all, as assessed using the Schubert et al. (2001) presence questionnaire [3]. Vection was, however, slightly but significantly improved by adding a rotating 3D-sound source that moved in accordance with the visual scene: Convincingness ratings increased from 60.2 (mono-sound) to 69.6 (3D-sound) (t(19)=-2.84, p=.01), and vection buildup-times decreased from 12.5s (mono-sound) to 11.1s (3D-sound) (t(19)=2.69, p=.015). Furthermore, overall presence ratings were increased slightly but significantly. Note that vection onset times were not significantly affected (9.6s vs. 9.9s, p>.05). We conclude that adding spatialized 3D-sound that moves concordantly with a visual self-motion simulation does not only increase overall presence, but also improves the self-motion sensation itself. The effect size for the vection measures was, however, rather small (about 15), which might be explained by a ceiling effect, as visually induced vection was already quite strong without the 3D-sound (9.9s vection onset time). Merely adding non-spatialized (mono) sound did not show any clear effects. These results have important implications for the understanding or multi-modal cue integration in general and self-motion simulations in Virtual Reality in particular.

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 Dates: 2005-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 3232
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Title: 8th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2005)
Place of Event: Tübingen, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2005-02-25 - 2005-02-27

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Title: 8th Tübingen Perception Conference: TWK 2005
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Bülthoff, HH1, Editor            
Mallot, HA1, Editor            
Ulrich, R, Editor
Wichmann, FA1, Editor            
Affiliations:
1 Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794            
Publ. Info: Kirchentellinsfurt, Germany : Knirsch
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 74 Identifier: ISBN: 3-927091-70-7