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  Activity in posterior superior temporal gyrus correlates inversely with kinematic information during observation of human actions

Schultz, J., Ingram, J., Wolpert, D., & Frith, C. (2004). Activity in posterior superior temporal gyrus correlates inversely with kinematic information during observation of human actions. Poster presented at 34th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2004), San Diego, CA, USA.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D7AF-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-5EC9-0
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Schultz, J1, 2, Author              
Ingram , JN, Author
Wolpert, DM, Author
Frith, CD, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2biological cy, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: The cortex surrounding the posterior superior temporal sulcus of humans and monkeys is known to be activated during observation of biological movements, including human actions (1,2). In our event-related fMRI experiment, 12 healthy human volunteers were asked to discriminate between 2 versions of four different human actions on the basis of their movement kinematics. The difficulty of the task was influenced by the number of joints showing differences between the two movement versions. Clusters in the posterior superior temporal sulcus region in both hemispheres were the only brain regions whose activity varied inversely with the number of joints with significant differences between the two movement versions (clusters identified by SPM RFX analysis with 12 subjects thresholded at p<0.001 uncorrected, correlation with activation in left STS: R² = 0.96, right STS: R²= 0.94). Activity in the cluster identified in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus also showed a trend to correlate positively with participants’ performance (non significant, p=0.13). These results suggest that the cortex surrounding the posterior superior temporal sulcus participates in the extraction of kinematic information from observed biological movements, with activity increasing with task difficulty.

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 Dates: 2004-10
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 3188
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Title: 34th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2004)
Place of Event: San Diego, CA, USA
Start-/End Date: 2004-10-23 - 2004-10-27

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Title: 34th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2004)
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 664.1 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -