English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Auditory and Multisensory Perception of Looming Signals by Rhesus Monkeys: A Naturalistic Behaviour Research

Maier, J., & Ghazanfar, A. (2004). Auditory and Multisensory Perception of Looming Signals by Rhesus Monkeys: A Naturalistic Behaviour Research. In 5. Neurowissenschaftliche Nachwuchskonferenz Tübingen (NeNa 2004) (pp. 10).

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D87B-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-679A-A
Genre: Meeting Abstract

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Maier, JX1, 2, Author              
Ghazanfar, AA2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Brains have evolved to process information that is important for the survival of animals in their natural environment. Instead of using experimental paradigms that involve artificial or arbitrary stimuli and a high degree of training and conditioning, it would therefore be better to study animals’ natural behavior and reactions using behaviourally-relevant stimuli. One of the most basic needs of animals is to be able to deal with rapidly approaching dangerous objects (predators, competitive individuals or abiotic sources). Animals across the animal kingdom show a bias for detecting looming signals --signals that indicate the rapid approach of objects-- over receding signals, in the visual domain. However, when vision fails, for example in darkness, animals must rely on their auditory system to detect looming motion. Under conditions where both visual and auditory signals can be detected, their bimodal integration can enhance detection and discriminability. We studied rhesus monkeys’ (Macaca mulatta) spontaneous behaviour in response to auditory and multisensory looming stimuli. First, using the head-orientation response, we showed that in the auditory domain, monkeys also have a bias for detecting looming signals over receding signals. We tested the effectiveness of two different auditory motion cues --dynamic intensity and pitch change-- for detecting looming sound sources. Both cues proved effective in detecting looming motion. Second, using the preferential looking paradigm, we showed that monkeys have a natural capacity for integrating auditory-visual looming, but not receding signals. This ability was dependent on the spectral structure of the sound. The results suggest an evolved bias for detecting ecologically relevant looming signals and reveal the power of using naturalistic paradigms for investigating the perception of sensory signals in primates.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2004-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: MaierG2004
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: 5. Neurowissenschaftliche Nachwuchskonferenz Tübingen (NeNa 2004)
Place of Event: Oberjoch, Germany
Start-/End Date: -

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: 5. Neurowissenschaftliche Nachwuchskonferenz Tübingen (NeNa 2004)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 10 Identifier: -