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  Time Course of the Face Identity Aftereffect

Müller, K.-M., & Leopold, D. (2004). Time Course of the Face Identity Aftereffect. Poster presented at 7th Tübingen Perception Conference (TWK 2004), Tübingen, Germany.

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 Creators:
Müller, K-M, Author           
Leopold, DA1, 2, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Exposure to a face can alter the perception of another subsequently presented face. Using a computational 3-D model derived from a database of 200 scanned faces [1,2], we have previously
demonstrated the existence of face identity aftereffect (FIAE) [3]. In a multidimensional
“face-space”, the average prototype face occupies the central position, while individual real
faces are represented as points or vectors emanating from the center. In this context, by inverting
a vector corresponding to an individual face, one can create a so-called “anti-face” [4],
which served as the adapting stimulus in our previous study. While the FIAE has much in
common with more traditional aftereffects, such as its negative sign and its storage during brief
unstimulated periods [3], its dynamic aspects have not yet been studied. The present investigation
aimed to determine the effects of adaptation and test durations on this phenomenon.
Subjects learned to recognize four faces at different identity levels over a period of several
sessions, until they could correctly name low-identity faces. We then tested the effects of adaptation
and testing duration on the FIAE. In each trial, one of the four names was shown on
the screen, followed by the presentation of an “adaptation” face (the anti-face of the named
individual) for a period between 1.0 and 16.0 s. Immediately following adaptation, a “test”
face (the average face) appeared for between 0.1 and 1.6 s. Subjects were required to rate,
on a scale of 1 to 7, the degree to which the test face resembled the individual named at the
beginning of the trial. They were specically told to restrict their judgment to the instant that
the test stimulus disappeared. The results indicate that the FIAE resembles other aftereffects in
that it is increased in magnitude by long adaptation times, as well as by short test times. Mean
ratings showed good ts to the adaptation and test times with positive and negative logarithmic
functions, respectively. However, despite this similarity, the magnitude of this proportionality
in the FIAE was considerably smaller than in low-level aftereffects.

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 Dates: 2004-02
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 2940
 Degree: -

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Title: 7th Tübingen Perception Conference (TWK 2004)
Place of Event: Tübingen, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2004-01-30 - 2004-02-01

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Title: 7th Tübingen Perception Conference: TWK 2004
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Bülthoff, HH1, Editor           
Mallot, HA, Editor           
Ulrich, RD, Editor
Wichmann, FA1, Editor           
Affiliations:
1 Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794            
Publ. Info: Kirchentellinsfurt, Germany : Knirsch
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 139 Identifier: ISBN: 3-927091-68-5