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  Neural mechanisms underlying control of a Brain-Computer-Interface (BCI): Simultaneous recording of bold-response and EEG

Hinterberger, T., Wilhelm, b., Veit, R., Weiskopf, n., Lal, T., & Birbaumer, N. (2004). Neural mechanisms underlying control of a Brain-Computer-Interface (BCI): Simultaneous recording of bold-response and EEG. Poster presented at 44th Annual Meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research, Santa Fe, NM, USA.

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Hinterberger, T, Author
Wilhelm, b, Author
Veit, R, Author              
Weiskopf , n, Author
Lal, TN1, 2, Author              
Birbaumer, N, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497795              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Brain computer interfaces (BCI) enable humans or animals to communicate or activate external devices without muscle activity using electric brain signals. The BCI Thought Translation Device (TTD) uses learned regulation of slow cortical potentials (SCPs), a skill most people and paralyzed patients can acquire with training periods of several hours up to months. The neurophysiological mechanisms and anatomical sources of SCPs and other event-related brain macro-potentials are well understood, but the neural mechanisms underlying learning of the self-regulation skill for BCI-use are unknown. To uncover the relevant areas of brain activation during regulation of SCPs, the TTD was combined with functional MRI and EEG was recorded inside the MRI scanner in twelve healthy participants who have learned to regulate their SCP with feedback and reinforcement. The results demonstrate activation of specific brain areas during execution of the brain regulation skill: successf! ul control of cortical positivity allowing a person to activate an external device was closely related to an increase of BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) response in the basal ganglia and frontal premotor deactivation indicating learned regulation of a cortical-striatal loop responsible for local excitation thresholds of cortical assemblies. The data suggest that human users of a BCI learn the regulation of cortical excitation thresholds of large neuronal assemblies as a prerequisite of direct brain communication: the learning of this skill depends critically on an intact and flexible interaction between these cortico-basal ganglia-circuits. Supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) and the National Institute of Health (NIH).

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 Dates: 2004-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 2798
DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2004.41s1_1.x
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Title: 44th Annual Meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research
Place of Event: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Start-/End Date: 2004-10-20 - 2004-10-24

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Title: Psychophysiology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY [etc.] : Blackwell Publishing Inc. [etc.]
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 41 (Supplement 1) Sequence Number: 089 Start / End Page: S100 Identifier: ISSN: 0048-5772
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925334698