English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The contributions of nonvisual cues, static visual cues, and optic flow in distance estimation

Campos, J., Young, M., Chan, G., Zhang, D.-H., Ellard, C., & Sun, H.-J. (2003). The contributions of nonvisual cues, static visual cues, and optic flow in distance estimation. Poster presented at Third Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2003), Sarasota, FL, USA.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-
OA-Status:

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Campos, J1, Author           
Young, M, Author
Chan, GS, Author
Zhang, D-H, Author
Ellard, CG, Author
Sun, H-J, Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: This study examined how visual and nonvisual cues are integrated in a distance estimation task by systematically varying cue availability. Distance stimuli were presented in one of three modes: by traversing a distance blindfolded (traversed distance — TD), by traversing a distance with optic flow (TDO), or by visually previewing a target distance from a static location (VPD). Distance estimates were then produced in one of the three modes in which the stimuli were presented. Each of these stimulus modes was paired with each of the three response modes and each subject experienced all combinations. Stimuli were presented in one direction and subjects turned 180 deg. before producing their estimates. Experiments were conducted in a large-scale, open, outdoor environment. During conditions in which the stimulus and response were delivered in the same mode (TD or VPD), when optic flow was absent, constant error was minimal, whereas when optic flow was present (TDO), overestimation was observed. In conditions in which the stimulus and response modes differed, the pattern of responding depended on whether or not optic flow was available. When optic flow was absent, if the stimulus was presented as a VPD and reported via TD (blind walking task), underestimation was observed. However, if the stimulus and response modes were reversed, overestimation was observed. In contrast, when optic flow was present, the opposite results were observed such that, if the stimulus was presented as a VPD and reported via TDO, overestimation was observed and if the stimulus and response modes were reversed, underestimation was observed. These results demonstrate that when optic flow is present in the response phase, overestimation occurs. Overall, the magnitude of error observed in conditions without optic flow was reasonably low, whereas errors in conditions with optic flow suggest that continuous visual monitoring does not necessarily enhance the accuracy of distance estimation.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2003-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1167/3.9.781
BibTex Citekey: 4531
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: Third Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2003)
Place of Event: Sarasota, FL, USA
Start-/End Date: 2003-05-09 - 2003-05-14

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Vision
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Charlottesville, VA : Scholar One, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 (9) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 781 Identifier: ISSN: 1534-7362
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111061245811050