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  How believable are real faces? Towards a perceptual basis for conversational animation

Cunningham, D., Breidt, M., Kleiner, M., Wallraven, C., & Bülthoff, H. (2003). How believable are real faces? Towards a perceptual basis for conversational animation. In 11th IEEE International Workshop on Program Comprehension (pp. 23-29). Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DC93-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-71D3-D
Genre: Conference Paper

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 Creators:
Cunningham, DW1, 2, Author              
Breidt, M1, 2, Author              
Kleiner, M1, 2, Author              
Wallraven, C1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Regardless of whether the humans involved are virtual or real, well-developed conversational skills are a necessity. The synthesis of interface agents that are not only understandable but also believable can be greatly aided by knowledge of which facial motions are perceptually necessary and sufficient for clear and believable conversational facial expressions. Here, we recorded several core conversational expressions (agreement, disagreement, happiness, sadness, thinking, and confusion) from several individuals, and then psychophysically determined the perceptual ambiguity and believability of the expressions. The results show that people can identify these expressions quite well, although there are some systematic patterns of confusion. People were also very confident of their identifications and found the expressions to be rather believable. The specific pattern of confusions and confidence ratings have strong implications for conversational animation. Finally, the present results provide the information necessary to begin a more fine-grained analysis of the core components of these expressions.

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 Dates: 2003-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1109/CASA.2003.1199300
BibTex Citekey: 2022
 Degree: -

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Title: 11th IEEE International Workshop on Program Comprehension: CASA 2003
Place of Event: New Brunswick, NJ, USA
Start-/End Date: 2003-05-08 - 2003-05-09

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Title: 11th IEEE International Workshop on Program Comprehension
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Publ. Info: Los Alamitos, CA, USA : IEEE
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 23 - 29 Identifier: ISBN: 0-7695-1934-2