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  The effect of mirrored visual feedback on the EEG correlates of pointing direction

Berndt, I., Wascher, E., Franz, V., Götz, K., & Bülthoff, H. (2001). The effect of mirrored visual feedback on the EEG correlates of pointing direction. Poster presented at First Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2001), Sarasota, FL, USA.

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Berndt, I1, 2, Author           
Wascher, E, Author
Franz, VH1, 2, Author           
Götz, KG2, 3, Author           
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
3Neurophysiologie des Insektenverhaltens, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497802              

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 Abstract: Purpose: Looking through laterally mirroring prisms produces at least two changes in the phenomenal appearance of the world: When stretching your right arm, for example, visual feedback will indicate that it is your left arm that is moving. But not only will the 'wrong' limb seem to be moving, it will also move in the diametrically opposite direction. Usually output and feedback of an action 'fit' (i.e., go to and come from the same limb). But when looking through mirroring prisms, visual feedback comes from the opposite arm and opposite direction. In order to behave properly under these circumstances, some kind of recalibration has to occur. The contralateral hemisphere is more strongly involved in controlling these arm movements. It is possible that this recalibration alters the lateralization of the neural activity that controls these movements. To test for this, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) and event-related lateralizations (ERLs) of the EEG during pointing movements with and without laterally mirrored vision. Targets were presented either centrally or laterally. Results: We found effects of mirrored vision on the lateralization of neural activity. The relative involvement of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the SEEN target position (objective position is reversed with mirrored feedback) increased, especially around 300-400ms after stimulus onset. Additionally, differences in the ERPs around the same time after target onset were evident. Both effects were maximal around the parietal and parieto-occipital sites, suggesting modified stimulus processing.

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 Dates: 2001-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1167/1.3.318
BibTex Citekey: 1163
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Title: First Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2001)
Place of Event: Sarasota, FL, USA
Start-/End Date: 2001-05

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Title: Journal of Vision
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Charlottesville, VA : Scholar One, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 1 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 318 Identifier: ISSN: 1534-7362
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111061245811050