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  fMRI adaptation for visual forms in the monkey brain

Kourtzi, Z., Tolias, A., Prause, B., Augath, M., Trinath, T., & Logothetis, N. (2001). fMRI adaptation for visual forms in the monkey brain. Poster presented at 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001), San Diego, CA, USA.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E1BB-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-AA17-2
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Kourtzi, Z1, 2, 3, Author              
Tolias, AS2, 3, Author              
Prause, BA2, 3, Author              
Augath, M2, 3, Author              
Trinath, T2, Author              
Logothetis, NK2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: The aim of the study is to understand how local image features are integrated into configurations that may represent visual forms. We used fMRI in the anesthetized monkey and employed an adaptation paradigm (sufficiently prolonged presentation of a stimulus resulting in decreased fMRI responses over time) to test the role of various visual areas into such an integration process. The stimuli consisted of target-shapes embedded in a background of randomly oriented lines. The target-shapes were defined by collinearly arranged lines of the same height and width as the background lines. Following the presentation of an adapting stimulus, three conditions were tested:(A)presentation of a pattern identical to the adapting stimulus, (B) presentation of the same target-shape as the adapting stimulus but embedded in a different background (i.e. the background lines were rotated 90 deg), and (C) presentation of a different target-shape (orientation-changes of target rather than background lines). The selection of these conditions was motivated by the hypothesis that increased responses in the test phase for a new pattern are likely to indicate areas with neural populations that are selective for the global configuration of shapes, rather than local features. Initial experiments show that the time course of the fMRI signal varies in different visual areas. Not surprisingly, early visual areas failed to show shape selective adaptation, suggesting that the neural populations in these areas primarily encode local features. Differences in the time course of adaptation in higher visual areas are currently studied using a variety of visual patterns.

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 Dates: 2001-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 1063
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Title: 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001)
Place of Event: San Diego, CA, USA
Start-/End Date: 2001-11-10 - 2001-11-15

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Title: 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001)
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 399.11 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -