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  In vivo study of connectivity with electrical microstimulation and fMRI

Logothetis, N., Pauls, J., Oeltermann, A., Augath, M., & Trinath, T. (2001). In vivo study of connectivity with electrical microstimulation and fMRI. In 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001).

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E1C1-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-AA01-A
Genre: Meeting Abstract

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 Creators:
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Pauls, J1, 2, Author              
Oeltermann, A1, 2, Author              
Augath, M1, 2, Author              
Trinath, T1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: We describe a new method that combines microstimulation with fMRI for the detailed study of neural connectivity in the alive animal. We used specially constructed microelectrodes to stimulate directly a selected subcortical or cortical area while simultaneously measuring changes in brain activity, indexed by the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. The exact location of the stimulation site was achieved by means of anatomical scans as well as by the study of the physiological properties of neurons. Imaging was carried out in a Biospec 4.7T/40 cm vertical bore scanner (Bruker, Inc), using pulse sequences described elsewhere (Logothetis et. al. Nature Neuroscience 1999). Electrical stimulation was delivered using a biphasic pulse generator attached to a constant-current stimulus isolation unit. Constant-current charge-balanced biphasic pulses (300usec, 50 to 150 uA, at 50 to 500 Hz) were delivered to the brain for 12.5 sec preceded and followed by 12.5 and 39 sec respectively. The compensation circuit, designed to minimize interference generated by the switching gradients during recording, was always active alleviating all gradient-induced currents in the range of the stimulation current. Local microstimulation of striate cortex yielded both local BOLD signals and activation of areas V2, V3, and MT. Microstimulation of dLGN resulted in the activation of striate cortex, as well as areas V2, V3, and MT. Our findings show that microstimulation combined with fMRI can be exquisitely used to find and study target areas of regions of electrophysiological interest.

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 Dates: 2001-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 1067
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Title: 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001)
Place of Event: San Diego, CA, USA
Start-/End Date: 2001-11-10 - 2001-11-15

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Title: 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001)
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 783.5 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -