English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Effects of categorization training on the neuronal representation of visual stimuli

Sigala, N., & Logothetis, N. (2001). Effects of categorization training on the neuronal representation of visual stimuli. Talk presented at 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001). San Diego, CA, USA.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E1E6-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E1E7-A
Genre: Talk

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Sigala, N1, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: The ability to make sense of the perceptual world by discriminating features and categorizing objects is a basic cognitive capacity. In combined psychophysical-electrophysiological experiments we investigated the representation of stimulus-related information in the anterior inferior temporal (IT) cortex of macaque monkeys, while they were performing a categorization task. We used parameterized line drawings of faces and fish as stimuli, and we varied the relevance of the different features for the task. In our neuronal sample most of the cells responded to both types of stimuli. A subset of neurons was more selective for stimuli with certain combinations of feature values. Finally, a third group of neurons encoded parametric information, mainly about the features of the stimuli that were relevant for the categorization task. It is reasonable to hypothesize that these neurons became finely tuned to the critical subset of the stimulus features during the categorization training, reflecting the monkeys’ perceptual increase of sensitivity for these dimensions. The neuronal responses were typically greatly influenced by stimulus manipulations such as scale changes and rotations in the frontal plane. This finding shows that following extensive training with a class of stimuli, some neurons in IT encode parametric information about relevant features. In current experiments we are simultaneously recording from the prefrontal and the IT cortices, in order to study the communication of the critical stimulus information between the two areas and their role in shaping the behavioral decision.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2001-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: URI: http://www.sfn.org/index.aspx?pagename=abstracts_ampublications
BibTex Citekey: 1052
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2001)
Place of Event: San Diego, CA, USA
Start-/End Date: -

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source

show