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  The influence of non-visual signals of walking on the perceived speed of optic flow

Thurrell, A., Pelah, A., & Distler, H. (1998). The influence of non-visual signals of walking on the perceived speed of optic flow. Poster presented at 21st European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 1998), Oxford, UK.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E82B-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-DFEC-7
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Thurrell, AEI, Author
Pelah, A, Author
Distler, HK1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: We considered how non-visual signals that accompany walking might influence the visual processing of optic flow. During natural locomotion optic-flow speed is determined by walking speed in a closed-loop manner. In the experiments subjects were required to adjust the speed of an optic-flow pattern to match that of a reference flow pattern in an open-loop manner. The visual speed was matched while walking by turning a hand-held knob that controlled the presented optic-flow speed. Subjects were also required to change their pace according to a written instruction at the beginning of each trial to either 'very slow', 'slow', 'normal', 'fast', or 'very fast'. A non-motorised, self-driven treadmill simulated natural walking by allowing subjects to walk at their chosen pace. The optic-flow pattern consisted of bright rectangles expanding against a dark background displayed on a large rear-projected screen. An experimental block consisted of a 15 s presentation of a reference pattern followed by 5 test trials, one at each pace randomly ordered and matched. Results showed a consistent increase of optic-flow speed with increasing walking speeds. However, speed settings were most accurate when subjects were walking at their chosen 'normal' walking pace. We conclude that the perceived speed of optic-flow information is influenced by non-visual signals (eg proprioception) such that optic-flow speed is overestimated at lower walking speeds while underestimated at higher speeds.

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 Dates: 1998-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: ThurrellPD1998
DOI: 10.1177/03010066980270S101
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Title: 21st European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 1998)
Place of Event: Oxford, UK
Start-/End Date: 1998-08-24 - 1998-08-28

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Title: Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Pion Ltd.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 27 (ECVP Abstract Supplement) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 147 Identifier: ISSN: 0301-0066
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925509369