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  Differences between Active-Explorers and Passive-Observers in Virtual Scene Recognition

Christou, C., & Bülthoff, H.(1998). Differences between Active-Explorers and Passive-Observers in Virtual Scene Recognition (62). Tübingen, Germany: Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E873-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-8E4A-C
Genre: Report

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MPIK-TR-62.pdf (Publisher version), 454KB
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 Creators:
Christou, C1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Recognition of a newly learned environment from both familiar and novel perspectives was investigated using a 3D-computer model in which observers made simulated translational and rotational head movements. They were encouraged to move around the environment to find and acknowledge spatially localized coded markers. During each acknowledgement the observers' viewing parameters were stored and later used for stimulus generation. The observers' movements were restricted to a small region of the environment and complete rotational head-movements were not allowed. To test the importance of making volitional movements during familiarization, two groups of observers were tested: active-explorers initiated their own movement through the environment while the passive-observers watched a playback of these movements. In the recognition tests, all participants were shown both familiar and novel views of both acknowledged and unacknowledged locations. Testing took place immediately and was repeated after 7 days. Results indicate that observers always found novel perspective views more difficult to recognize than familiar views, and surprise locations more difficult than acknowledged locations. The principle difference between active and passive was an advantage in recognizing novel direction views by active-explorers. This difference became more pronounced over the course of seven days. The results provide evidence for egocentric encoding and suggest that this can be reduced, if only marginally, by facilitating observer self-locomotion during learning.

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 Dates: 1998-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 13
 Publishing info: Tübingen, Germany : Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: Report Nr.: 62
BibTex Citekey: 1530
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Title: Technical Report of the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 62 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: -