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  The active control of wing rotation by Drosophila

Dickinson, M., Lehmann, F., & Götz, K. (1993). The active control of wing rotation by Drosophila. The Journal of Experimental Biology, 182(1), 173-189.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-EDBA-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-FFD6-B
Genre: Journal Article

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https://jeb.biologists.org/content/182/1/173 (Publisher version)
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 Creators:
Dickinson, MH1, 2, Author              
Lehmann, FO1, 2, Author              
Götz, KG1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Former Department Neurophysiology of Insect Behavior, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497802              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: This paper investigates the temporal control of a fast wing rotation in flies, the ventral flip, which occurs during the transition from downstroke to upstroke. Tethered flying Drosophila actively modulate the timing of these rapid supinations during yaw responses evoked by an oscillating visual stimulus. The time difference between the two wings is controlled such that the wing on the outside of a fictive turn rotates in advance of its contralateral partner. This modulation of ventral-flip timing between the two wings is strongly coupled with changes in wing-stroke amplitude. Typically, an increase in the stroke amplitude of one wing is correlated with an advance in the timing of the ventral flip of the same wing. However, flies do display a limited ability to control these two behaviors independently, as shown by flight records in which the correlation between ventral-flip timing and stroke amplitude transiently reverses. The control of ventral-flip timing may be part of an unsteady aerodynamic mechanism that enables the fly to alter the magnitude and direction of flight forces during turning maneuvers.

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 Dates: 1993-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 563
 Degree: -

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Title: The Journal of Experimental Biology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Published for the Company of Biologists Ltd. by the Cambridge University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 182 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 173 - 189 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-0949
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110992357319088_1