English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The wing beat of Drosophila Melanogaster II: Dynamics

Zanker, J., & Götz, K. (1990). The wing beat of Drosophila Melanogaster II: Dynamics. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B: Biological Sciences, 327(1238), 19-44. doi:10.1098/rstb.1990.0041.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-EEC3-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-0E62-D
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Zanker, JM1, 2, Author              
Götz, KG1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Former Department Neurophysiology of Insect Behavior, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497802              
2Former Department Information Processing in Insects, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497801              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: The wing beat of tiny insects has attracted considerable interest because conventional aerodynamics predicts a reduction of flight efficiency when aerofoils are comparatively small and slow. Here, two approaches are reported by which we investigated the dynamics of the wing beat of tethered flying Drosophila melanogaster. First, the forces acting on the moving wing were calculated from three-dimensional kinematic data, following the blade-element theory which assumes quasi-steady aerodynamics. Under these conditions, the flight force is directed upwards, relative to the longitudinal body axis, during the second half of the downstroke; it is oriented forwards and downwards during the upstroke. The time average of the force generated according to this theory does not correspond to the direction and magnitude of the actual average force of flight. The expected force is directed forwards, along the body’s longitudinal axis, and is too small to keep the fly airborne. Secondly, an attempt is made to measure the timecourse of flight forces by attaching the fly to along the body’s longitudinal axis, and is too small to keep the fly airborne. Secondly, an attempt is made to measure the timecourse of flight forces by attaching the fly to a string, the displacement of which is monitored by means of laser interferometry. A sharp lift-pulse is observed when the wing is rapidly rotated during the ventral reversal of the wing-beat cycle. A second lift maximum of variable strength seems to be associated with the squeeze-peel events during the dorsal reversal. These results support the notion that flight in small insects might be dominated by unsteady mechanisms.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 1990-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 560
DOI: 10.1098/rstb.1990.0041
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B: Biological Sciences
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 327 (1238) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 19 - 44 Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8436
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/963017382021_1