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  Action simulation: Time course and representational mechanisms

Springer, A., Parkinson, J., & Prinz, W. (2013). Action simulation: Time course and representational mechanisms. Frontiers in Psychology, 4: 387. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00387.

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 Creators:
Springer, Anne1, 2, Author              
Parkinson, Jim3, 4, Author
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, Germany, ou_634564              
2Department of Sport and Exercise Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, London, UK, ou_persistent22              
4Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex, Falmer, UK, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: action simulation; internal forward models; occlusion; point-light action; predictive coding; static matching
 Abstract: The notion of action simulation refers to the ability to re-enact foreign actions (i.e., actions observed in other individuals). Simulating others' actions implies a mirroring of their activities, based on one's own sensorimotor competencies. Here, we discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to action simulation and the study of its representational underpinnings. One focus of our discussion is on the timing of internal simulation and its relation to the timing of external action, and a paradigm that requires participants to predict the future course of actions that are temporarily occluded from view. We address transitions between perceptual mechanisms (referring to action representation before and after occlusion) and simulation mechanisms (referring to action representation during occlusion). Findings suggest that action simulation runs in real-time; acting on newly created action representations rather than relying on continuous visual extrapolations. A further focus of our discussion pertains to the functional characteristics of the mechanisms involved in predicting other people's actions. We propose that two processes are engaged, dynamic updating and static matching, which may draw on both semantic and motor information. In a concluding section, we discuss these findings in the context of broader theoretical issues related to action and event representation, arguing that a detailed functional analysis of action simulation in cognitive, neural, and computational terms may help to further advance our understanding of action cognition and motor control.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-04-132013-06-102013-07-04
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00387
PMID: 23847563
PMC: PMC3701141
Other: eCollection 2013
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 4 Sequence Number: 387 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078