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  Auditory filter width affects response magnitude but not frequency specificity in auditory cortex

Herrmann, B., Henry, M., Scharinger, M., & Obleser, J. (2013). Auditory filter width affects response magnitude but not frequency specificity in auditory cortex. Hearing Research, 304, 128-136. doi:10.1016/j.heares.2013.07.005.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-FC28-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-ACE9-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Herrmann, Björn1, Author              
Henry, Molly1, Author              
Scharinger, Mathias1, Author              
Obleser, Jonas1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_751545              

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 Abstract: Spectral analysis of acoustic stimuli occurs in the auditory periphery (termed frequency selectivity) as well as at the level of auditory cortex (termed frequency specificity). Frequency selectivity is commonly investigated using an auditory filter model, while frequency specificity is often investigated as neural adaptation of the N1 response in electroencephalography (EEG). However, the effects of aging on frequency-specific adaptation, and the link between peripheral frequency selectivity and neural frequency specificity have not received much attention. Here, normal hearing younger (20–31 years) and older participants (49–63 years) underwent a psychophysical notched noise experiment to estimate individual auditory filters, and an EEG experiment to investigate frequency-specific adaptation in auditory cortex. The shape of auditory filters was comparable between age groups, and thus shows intact frequency selectivity in normal aging. In auditory cortex, both groups showed N1 frequency-specific neural adaptation effects that similarly varied with the spectral variance in the stimulation, while N1 responses were overall larger for older than younger participants. Importantly, the overall N1 amplitude, but not frequency-specific neural adaptation was correlated with the pass-band of the auditory filter. Thus, the current findings show a dissociation of peripheral frequency selectivity and neural frequency specificity, but suggest that widened auditory filters are compensated for by a response gain in frequency-specific areas of auditory cortex.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-07-102013-05-042013-07-122013-07-202013-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.heares.2013.07.005
PMID: 23876524
Other: Epub 2013
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Title: Hearing Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 304 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 128 - 136 Identifier: ISSN: 0378-5955
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925527845