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  Keys and seats: Spatial response coding underlying the joint spatial compatibility effect

Dittrich, K., Dolk, T., Rothe-Wulf, A., Klauer, K. C., & Prinz, W. (2013). Keys and seats: Spatial response coding underlying the joint spatial compatibility effect. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 75(8), 1725-1736. doi:10.3758/s13414-013-0524-z.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-FA44-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8502-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Dittrich, Kerstin1, Author
Dolk, Thomas2, Author              
Rothe-Wulf, Annelie1, Author
Klauer, Karl Christoph1, Author
Prinz, Wolfgang2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Albert Ludwigs University Freiburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              

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Free keywords: Simon effect; Action co-representation; Joint action; Spatial compatibility task; Dimensional overlap; Spatial response coding
 Abstract: Spatial compatibility effects (SCEs) are typically observed when participants have to execute spatially defined responses to nonspatial stimulus features (e.g., the color red or green) that randomly appear to the left and the right. Whereas a spatial correspondence of stimulus and response features facilitates response execution, a noncorrespondence impairs task performance. Interestingly, the SCE is drastically reduced when a single participant responds to one stimulus feature (e.g., green) by operating only one response key (individual go/no-go task), whereas a full-blown SCE is observed when the task is distributed between two participants (joint go/no-go task). This joint SCE (a.k.a. the social Simon effect) has previously been explained by action/task co-representation, whereas alternative accounts ascribe joint SCEs to spatial components inherent in joint go/no-go tasks that allow participants to code their responses spatially. Although increasing evidence supports the idea that spatial rather than social aspects are responsible for joint SCEs emerging, it is still unclear to which component(s) the spatial coding refers to: the spatial orientation of response keys, the spatial orientation of responding agents, or both. By varying the spatial orientation of the responding agents (Exp. 1) and of the response keys (Exp. 2), independent of the spatial orientation of the stimuli, in the present study we found joint SCEs only when both the seating and the response key alignment matched the stimulus alignment. These results provide evidence that spatial response coding refers not only to the response key arrangement, but also to the—often neglected—spatial orientation of the responding agents.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-07-172013-07-302013-11-21
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3758/s13414-013-0524-z
PMID: 23896690
 Degree: -

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Title: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
  Abbreviation : Atten Percept Psychophys
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Psychonomic Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 75 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1725 - 1736 Identifier: ISSN: 1943-3921
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1943-3921