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  Current understanding of the regulation of methionine biosynthesis in plants

Hesse, H., Kreft, O., Maimann, S., Zeh, M., & Hoefgen, R. (2004). Current understanding of the regulation of methionine biosynthesis in plants. In Journal of Experimental Botany (pp. 1799-1808).

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Hesse, H.1, Author              
Kreft, O.1, Author              
Maimann, S.1, Author              
Zeh, M.1, Author              
Hoefgen, R.1, Author              
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1Amino Acid and Sulfur Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1753337              

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Free keywords: cystathionine gamma-synthase cystathionine beta-lyase methionine biosynthesis methionine synthase cystathionine gamma-synthase bacterial serine acetyltransferase transgenic potato plants adenosyl-l-methionine increased nutritive-value messenger-rna stability lysine-plus-threonine beta-lyase activity seed albumin gene arabidopsis-thaliana
 Abstract: Plants can provide most of the nutrients for the human diet. However, the major crops are often deficient in some of the nutrients. Thus, malnutrition, with respect to micronutrients such as vitamin A, iron, and zinc, but also macronutrients such as the essential amino acids lysine and methionine, affects more than 40% of the world's population. Recent advances in molecular biology, but also the grasp of biochemical pathways, metabolic fluxes, and networks can now be exploited to produce crops enhanced in key nutrients to increase the nutritional value of plant-derived foods and feeds. Some of the predictions appear to be accurate, while others not, reflecting the fact that plant metabolism is more complex than presently understood. A good example for a complex regulation is the methionine biosynthetic pathway in plants. The nutritional importance of Met and cysteine has motivated extensive studies of their roles in plant molecular physiology, especially regarding to their transport, synthesis, and accumulation in plants. Recent studies have demonstrated that Met metabolism is regulated differently in various plant species.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2004
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: ISI: ISI:000223589400005
DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erh139
URI: ://000223589400005 http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/55/404/1799.full.pdf
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Title: Journal of Experimental Botany
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Title: Journal of Experimental Botany
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1799 - 1808 Identifier: -