English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Structural brain plasticity in Parkinson's disease induced by balance training

Sehm, B., Taubert, M., Conde, V., Weise, D., Classen, J., Dukart, J., et al. (2014). Structural brain plasticity in Parkinson's disease induced by balance training. Neurobiology of Aging, 35(1), 232-239. doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.06.021.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-184A-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7F93-9
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Sehm, Bernhard1, 2, Author              
Taubert, Marco1, Author              
Conde, Virginia1, Author              
Weise, David2, Author
Classen, Joseph2, Author
Dukart, Jürgen1, Author              
Draganski, Bogdan3, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 2, Author              
Ragert, Patrick1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Laboratoire de Recherche en Neuroimagerie (LREN), Centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Parkinson's disease; Balance control; Postural instability; Learning-dependent plasticity; Voxel-based morphometry; Compensation
 Abstract: We investigated morphometric brain changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with balance training. A total of 20 patients and 16 healthy matched controls learned a balance task over a period of 6 weeks. Balance testing and structural magnetic resonance imaging were performed before and after 2, 4, and 6 training weeks. Balance performance was re-evaluated after ∼20 months. Balance training resulted in performance improvements in both groups. Voxel-based morphometry revealed learning-dependent gray matter changes in the left hippocampus in healthy controls. In PD patients, performance improvements were correlated with gray matter changes in the right anterior precuneus, left inferior parietal cortex, left ventral premotor cortex, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, and left middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, a TIME × GROUP interaction analysis revealed time-dependent gray matter changes in the right cerebellum. Our results highlight training-induced balance improvements in PD patients that may be associated with specific patterns of structural brain plasticity. In summary, we provide novel evidence for the capacity of the human brain to undergo learning-related structural plasticity even in a pathophysiological disease state such as in PD.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-06-072012-12-192013-06-302013-08-012014-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.06.021
PMID: 23916062
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Neurobiology of Aging
  Other : Neurobiol. Aging
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: New York, NY [etc.] : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 35 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 232 - 239 Identifier: ISSN: 0197-4580
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925491902