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  Human perceptual decision making: Disentangling task onset and stimulus onset

Cardoso-Leite, P., Waszak, F., & Lepsien, J. (2014). Human perceptual decision making: Disentangling task onset and stimulus onset. Human Brain Mapping, 35(7), 3170-3187. doi:10.1002/hbm.22393.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-1B29-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8384-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro1, 2, Author              
Waszak, Floian3, 4, Author
Lepsien, Jöran1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634558              
2University of Geneva, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
3Université Paris Descartes, France, ou_persistent22              
4Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Face house discrimination task; fMRI; Perceptual decision-making; Task preparation; Left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
 Abstract: The left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (ldlPFC) has been highlighted as a key actor in human perceptual decision-making (PDM): It is theorized to support decision-formation independently of stimulus type or motor response. PDM studies however generally confound stimulus onset and task onset; when the to-be-recognized stimulus is presented, subjects know that a stimulus is shown and can set up processing resources—even when they do not know which stimulus is shown. We hypothesized that the ldlPFC might be involved in task preparation rather than decision-formation. To test this, we asked participants to report whether sequences of noisy images contained a face or a house within an experimental design that decorrelates stimulus and task onset. Decision-related processes should yield a sustained response during the task, whereas preparation-related areas should yield transient responses at its beginning. The results show that the brain activation pattern at task onset is strikingly similar to that observed in previous PDM studies. In particular, they contradict the idea that ldlPFC forms an abstract decision and suggest instead that its activation reflects preparation for the upcoming task. We further investigated the role of the fusiform face areas and parahippocampal place areas which are thought to be face and house detectors, respectively, that feed their signals to higher-level decision areas. The response patterns within these areas suggest that this interpretation is unlikely and that the decisions about the presence of a face or a house in a noisy image might instead already be computed within these areas without requiring higher-order areas.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-08-022013-10-182014-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.22393
PMID: 24142534
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 35 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3170 - 3187 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601686