English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Global budget of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Temporal and spatial variations of the dominant sources and sinks

Kettle, A. J., Kuhn, U., von Hobe, M., Kesselmeier, J., & Andreae, M. O. (2002). Global budget of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Temporal and spatial variations of the dominant sources and sinks. Journal of Geophysical Research, 107(D22): 4658. doi:10.1029/2002JD002187.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article
Alternative Title : J. Geophys. Res.

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kettle, A. J.1, Author              
Kuhn, U.1, Author              
von Hobe, M.1, Author              
Kesselmeier, J.1, Author              
Andreae, M. O.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826286              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: carbonyl sulfide; sinks; sources; vegetation; ocean; soil
 Abstract: [1] The spatial and temporal variability of the global fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is discussed together with possible implications for total column atmospheric COS loading. The input of COS into the atmosphere is calculated as the sum of all known direct sources of COS plus the conversion of carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) to COS by atmospheric oxidation processes. Recent models are used to predict COS, CS2, and DMS release from the oceans and COS uptake by soils, plants, and oceans. This forward approach to constructing global integrated COS fluxes has a large associated range of uncertainty. The best guess global annual- integrated COS net flux estimate does not differ from zero within the range of estimated uncertainty, consistent with the observed absence of long-term trends in atmospheric COS loading. Interestingly, the hemispheric time-dependent monthly fluxes are very close in phase for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The monthly variation of the Northern Hemisphere flux seems to be driven primarily by high COS vegetation uptake in summer, while the monthly variation of the Southern Hemisphere flux appears to be driven mostly by high oceanic fluxes of COS, CS2, and DMS in summer.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2002-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 18199
ISI: 000180867500058
DOI: 10.1029/2002JD002187
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Geophysical Research
  Alternative Title : J. Geophys. Res.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 107 (D22) Sequence Number: 4658 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0747-7309