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  Valence, arousal, and task effects in emotional prosody processing

Paulmann, S., Bleichner, M., & Kotz, S. A. (2013). Valence, arousal, and task effects in emotional prosody processing. Frontiers in Psychology, 4: 345. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00345.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-3D39-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-ACD7-9
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Paulmann, Silke1, Author              
Bleichner, M.2, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
4School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: P200; LPC; ERPs; Arousal; Task demands; Emotion; Prosody
 Abstract: Previous research suggests that emotional prosody processing is a highly rapid and complex process. In particular, it has been shown that different basic emotions can be differentiated in an early event-related brain potential (ERP) component, the P200. Often, the P200 is followed by later long lasting ERPs such as the late positive complex. The current experiment set out to explore in how far emotionality and arousal can modulate these previously reported ERP components. In addition, we also investigated the influence of task demands (implicit vs. explicit evaluation of stimuli). Participants listened to pseudo-sentences (sentences with no lexical content) spoken in six different emotions or in a neutral tone of voice while they either rated the arousal level of the speaker or their own arousal level. Results confirm that different emotional intonations can first be differentiated in the P200 component, reflecting a first emotional encoding of the stimulus possibly including a valence tagging process. A marginal significant arousal effect was also found in this time-window with high arousing stimuli eliciting a stronger P200 than low arousing stimuli. The P200 component was followed by a long lasting positive ERP between 400 and 750 ms. In this late time-window, both emotion and arousal effects were found. No effects of task were observed in either time-window. Taken together, results suggest that emotion relevant details are robustly decoded during early processing and late processing stages while arousal information is only reliably taken into consideration at a later stage of processing.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-04-082013-05-282013-06-21
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00345
PMID: 23801973
PMC: PMC3689289
Other: eCollection 2013
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 4 Sequence Number: 345 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: /journals/resource/1664-1078