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  The silver lining of a mind in the clouds: Interesting musings are associated with positive mood while mind-wandering

Franklin, M. S., Mrazek, M. D., Anderson, C. L., Smallwood, J., Kingstone, A., & Schooler, J. W. (2013). The silver lining of a mind in the clouds: Interesting musings are associated with positive mood while mind-wandering. Frontiers in Psychology, 4: 583. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00583.

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Franklin_TheSilverLining.pdf (Publisher version), 703KB
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 Creators:
Franklin, M. S.1, Author
Mrazek, M. D. 1, Author
Anderson, C. L. 2, Author
Smallwood, Jonathan3, Author              
Kingstone, A.4, Author
Schooler, J. W.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
4Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Mind-wandering; Mood; Daydreaming; Experience sampling; Emotion
 Abstract: The negative effects of mind-wandering on performance and mood have been widely documented. In a recent well-cited study, Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) conducted a large experience sampling study revealing that all off-task episodes, regardless of content, have equal to or lower happiness ratings, than on-task episodes. We present data from a similarly implemented experience sampling study with additional mind-wandering content categories. Our results largely conform to those of the Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) study, with mind-wandering generally being associated with a more negative mood. However, subsequent analyses reveal situations in which a more positive mood is reported after being off-task. Specifically when off-task episodes are rated for interest, the high interest episodes are associated with an increase in positive mood compared to all on-task episodes. These findings both identify a situation in which mind-wandering may have positive effects on mood, and suggest the possible benefits of encouraging individuals to shift their off-task musings to the topics they find most engaging.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-05-302013-08-132013-08-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00583
PMID: 24009599
PMC: PMC3755259
Other: eCollection 2013
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 4 Sequence Number: 583 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078