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  Early socio-communicative forms and functions in typical Rett syndrome

Bartl-Pokorny, K. D., Marschik, P. B., Sigafoos, J., Tager-Flusberg, H., Kaufmann, W. E., Grossmann, T., et al. (2013). Early socio-communicative forms and functions in typical Rett syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34(10), 3133-3138. doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2013.06.040.

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 Creators:
Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D.1, Author
Marschik, Peter B.1, Author
Sigafoos, Jeff2, Author
Tager-Flusberg, Helen3, Author
Kaufmann, Walter E.4, Author
Grossmann, Tobias5, Author              
Einspieler, Christa1, Author
Affiliations:
1Institute of Psychology, Karl Franzens University, Graz, Austria, ou_persistent22              
2Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Boston Children's Hospital, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
5Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              

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Free keywords: Family videos; Home videos; Infants; Retrospective analysis; Rett syndrome; Socio-communicative development; Video analysis
 Abstract: Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurological disorder characterized by a developmental regression in motor and speech-language domains. There is, however, limited research on socio-communicative development of affected children before the onset of regression. We analyzed audio–video recordings made by parents of six 9- to 12-month old girls later diagnosed with typical RTT, applying the Inventory of Potential Communicative Acts (IPCA) to identify early communicative forms and functions. Each girl used at least one communicative form (e.g., body movement, eye gaze, or vocalizations) to gain attention and answer, but none were observed to make choices or request information. Varying numbers of children were observed to perform other communicative functions according to the IPCA including social convention, rejecting or requesting an object. Non-verbal forms (e.g., reaching, moving closer, eye contact, smiling) were more common than non-linguistic verbal forms (e.g., unspecified vocalizations, pleasure vocalizations, crying). (Pre-)linguistic verbal forms (e.g., canonical or variegated babbling, proto-words) were not used for communicative purposes. These data suggest that atypical developmental patterns in the socio-communicative domain are evident prior to regression in young individuals later diagnosed with RTT.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-06-262013-06-262013-07-242013-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.06.040
PMID: 23891731
PMC: PMC5951273
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

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Title: Research in Developmental Disabilities
  Abbreviation : Res Dev Disabil
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Pergamon Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 34 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3133 - 3138 Identifier: ISSN: 0891-4222
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/0891-4222