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  Comparative quantitative analysis reveals preserved structural connectivity patterns in the human and macaque brain

Goulas, A., Bastiani, M., Bezgin, G., Uylings, H. B. M., Roebroeck, A., & Stiers, P. (2012). Comparative quantitative analysis reveals preserved structural connectivity patterns in the human and macaque brain. Poster presented at Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, LA, USA.

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SFN poster_comparative.pdf (Any fulltext), 383KB
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SFN poster_comparative.pdf
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Poster SFN 2012
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 Creators:
Goulas, Alexandros1, Author              
Bastiani, Matteo, Author
Bezgin, Gleb, Author
Uylings, Harry B. M., Author
Roebroeck , Alard, Author
Stiers, Peter, Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Comparative connectomics; Macaque; Human; Structural connectivity; Network analysis
 Abstract: The macaque brain serves as a model for the human brain, but its suitability is challenged by unique human features, including connectivity reconfigurations, which emerged during primate evolution. We perform a quantitative comparative analysis of the whole brain macroscale structural connectivity of the two species. Our findings suggest that the human and macaque brain as a whole are similarly wired. A region-wise analysis reveals many interspecies similarities of connectivity patterns, but also lack thereof, primarily involving cingulate and parietal regions. We unravel a common structural backbone in both species involving a highly overlapping set of regions. This structural backbone, important for mediating information across the brain, constitutes a feature of the primate brain persevering evolution. Our findings illustrate novel evolutionary aspects at the macroscale connectivity level, including the existence of common topological structures, and offer a quantitative translational bridge between macaque and human research.

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 Dates: 2012-10
 Publication Status: Not specified
 Pages: -
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Title: Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience
Place of Event: New Orleans, LA, USA
Start-/End Date: 2012-10-13 - 2012-10-17

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