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  Sex differences in the development of brain mechanisms for processing biological motion

Anderson, L. C., Bolling, D. Z., Schelinski, S., Coffman, M. C., Pelphrey, K. A., & Kaiser, M. D. (2013). Sex differences in the development of brain mechanisms for processing biological motion. NeuroImage, 83, 751-760. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.07.040.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-5C9B-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-840A-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Anderson, L. C.1, Author
Bolling, D. Z.1, Author
Schelinski, Stefanie2, Author              
Coffman, M. C.1, Author
Pelphrey, K. A.1, Author
Kaiser, M. D.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, 230 South Frontage Road, New Haven, CT 06520, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              

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Free keywords: Sex differences; Brain development; Biological motion; fMRI; Amygdala
 Abstract: Disorders related to social functioning including autism and schizophrenia differ drastically in incidence and severity between males and females. Little is known about the neural systems underlying these sex-linked differences in risk and resiliency. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a task involving the visual perception of point-light displays of coherent and scrambled biological motion, we discovered sex differences in the development of neural systems for basic social perception. In adults, we identified enhanced activity during coherent biological motion perception in females relative to males in a network of brain regions previously implicated in social perception including amygdala, medial temporal gyrus, and temporal pole. These sex differences were less pronounced in our sample of school-age youth. We hypothesize that the robust neural circuitry supporting social perception in females, which diverges from males beginning in childhood, may underlie sex differences in disorders related to social processing.

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 Dates: 2013-07-152013-07-202013-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.07.040
PMID: 23876243
PMC: PMC3815992
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 83 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 751 - 760 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166