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  Musical groove modulates motor cortex excitability: A TMS investigation

Stupacher, J., Hove, M. J., Novembre, G., Schütz-Bosbach, S., & Keller, P. E. (2013). Musical groove modulates motor cortex excitability: A TMS investigation. Brain and Cognition, 82(2), 127-136. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2013.03.003.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-5E16-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-850F-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Stupacher, Jan1, 2, Author
Hove, Michael J.1, Author              
Novembre, Giacomo1, Author              
Schütz-Bosbach, Simone3, Author              
Keller, Peter E.1, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
2Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Body and Self, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634554              
4The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Music; Groove; Auditory-motor interaction; Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS); Corticospinal excitability
 Abstract: Groove is often described as a musical quality that can induce movement in a listener. This study examines the effects of listening to groove music on corticospinal excitability. Musicians and non-musicians listened to high-groove music, low-groove music, and spectrally matched noise, while receiving single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex either on-beat or off-beat. We examined changes in the amplitude of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), recorded from hand and arm muscles, as an index of activity within the motor system. Musicians and non-musicians rated groove similarly. MEP results showed that high-groove music modulated corticospinal excitability, whereas no difference occurred between low-groove music and noise. More specifically, musicians’ MEPs were larger with high-groove than low-groove music, and this effect was especially pronounced for on-beat compared to off-beat pulses. These results indicate that high-groove music increasingly engages the motor system, and the temporal modulation of corticospinal excitability with the beat could stem from tight auditory–motor links in musicians. Conversely, non-musicians’ MEPs were smaller for high-groove than low-groove music, and there was no effect of on- versus off-beat pulses, potentially stemming from suppression of overt movement. In sum, high-groove music engages the motor system, and previous training modulates how listening to music with a strong groove activates the motor system.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-03-292013-05-062013-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.bandc.2013.03.003
PMID: 23660433
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

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Title: Brain and Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 82 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 127 - 136 Identifier: ISSN: 0278-2626
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922648105