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  Affect and the brain's functional organization: A resting-state connectivity approach

Rohr, C., Okon-Singer, H., Craddock, R. C., Villringer, A., & Margulies, D. S. (2013). Affect and the brain's functional organization: A resting-state connectivity approach. PLoS One, 8(7): e68015. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068015.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-6954-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-86E8-0
Genre: Journal Article

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Rohr_Affect.pdf (Publisher version), 1015KB
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2013
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© 2013 Rohr et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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 Creators:
Rohr, Christiane1, 2, Author              
Okon-Singer, Hadas1, 2, Author              
Craddock, R. Cameron3, 4, Author
Villringer, Arno1, 2, Author              
Margulies, Daniel S.1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Child Mind Institute, New York, NY, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: The question of how affective processing is organized in the brain is still a matter of controversial discussions. Based on previous initial evidence, several suggestions have been put forward regarding the involved brain areas: (a) right-lateralized dominance in emotional processing, (b) hemispheric dominance according to positive or negative valence, (c) one network for all emotional processing and (d) region-specific discrete emotion matching. We examined these hypotheses by investigating intrinsic functional connectivity patterns that covary with results of the Positive and Negative Affective Schedule (PANAS) from 65 participants. This approach has the advantage of being able to test connectivity rather than activation, and not requiring a potentially confounding task. Voxelwise functional connectivity from 200 regions-of-interest covering the whole brain was assessed. Positive and negative affect covaried with functional connectivity involving a shared set of regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, the visual cortex and the cerebellum. In addition, each affective domain had unique connectivity patterns, and the lateralization index showed a right hemispheric dominance for negative affect. Therefore, our results suggest a predominantly right-hemispheric network with affect-specific elements as the underlying organization of emotional processes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-01-272013-05-252013-07-23
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0068015
PMID: 23935850
PMC: PMC3720669
Other: Print 2013
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 (7) Sequence Number: e68015 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: /journals/resource/1000000000277850