English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Neural correlates of gesture-syntax interaction

Gunter, T. C., Kroczek, L., Holle, H., & Friederici, A. D. (2013). Neural correlates of gesture-syntax interaction. Poster presented at Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL) 2013 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, USA.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-7861-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-D849-A
Genre: Poster

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Gunter, Thomas C.1, Author              
Kroczek, Leon1, Author              
Holle, H., Author
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: syntax gesture
 Abstract: Neural correlates of gesture-syntax interaction. Thomas C. Gunter1, Leon Kroczek1, Henning Holle2, & Angela D. Friederici1 1Max-Planck-Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany 2Department of Psychology, University of Hull, Hull, UK In a communicative situation, gestures are an important source of information which also impacts speech processing. Gesture can for instance help when speech perception is troubled by noise (Obermeier et al., 2012) or when speech is ambiguous (Holle et al., 2007). Recently, we have shown that not only meaning, but also structural information (syntax) used during language comprehension is influenced by gestures (Holle et al., 2012). Beat gestures, which highlight particular words in a sentence, seem to be able to disambiguate sentences that are temporarily ambiguous with respect to their syntactic structure. Here we explored the underlying neural substrates of the gesture-syntax interaction with fMRI using similar ambiguous sentence material as Holle et al. (2012). Participants were presented with two types of sentence structures which were either easy (Subject-Object-Verb) or more difficult (Object-Subject-Verb) in their syntactic complexity. A beat gesture was shown either at the first or the second noun phrase (NP). Activations related to syntactic complexity were primarily lateralized to the left (IFG, pre-SMA, pre-central gyrus, and MTG) and bilateral for the Insula. A ROI-based analysis showed interactions of syntax and gesture in the left MTG, left pre-SMA, and in the bilateral Insula activations. The pattern of the interaction suggests that a beat on NP1 facilitates the easy SOV structure and inhibits the more difficult OSV structure and vise versa for a beat on NP2. Because the IFG was unaffected by beat gestures it seems to play an independent/isolated role in syntax processing.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2013-11-06
 Publication Status: Not specified
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: -
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL) 2013 Annual Meeting
Place of Event: San Diego, CA, USA
Start-/End Date: 2013-11-06 - 2013-11-08

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source

show