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  Extensive stimulus repetition leads older adults to show delayed functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation

Miyakoshi, M., Chen, S.-H.-A., Matsuo, K., Wu, C.-Y., Suzuki, A., & Nakai, T. (2012). Extensive stimulus repetition leads older adults to show delayed functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation. Brain Imaging and Behavior, 6(3), 357-365. doi:10.1007/s11682-012-9148-5.

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 Creators:
Miyakoshi, Makoto1, Author
Chen, Shen-Hsing Annabel2, Author
Matsuo, Kayako3, Author
Wu, Chiao-Yi2, Author              
Suzuki, Atsunobu4, Author
Nakai, Toshiharu1, Author
Affiliations:
1Neuroimaging and Informatics Lab, Department of Gerontechnology, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Ohbu, Aichi, Japan, ou_persistent22              
2Division of Psychology, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, ou_persistent22              
3Center for Optoelectronic Biomedicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Social and Human Environment, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Aging; fMRI; Adaptation; Repetition suppression; Scene recognition; Parahippocampus
 Abstract: We investigated whether extensive repetition can diminish age-related differences between younger and older adults in functional magnetic resonance adaptation (fMR-A). Datasets were obtained from 26 younger and 24 older healthy adults presented with two scenes that repeated 20 times amongst other novel scenes during fMRI scanning. The average cortical responses to the first eight (Repetitions 1-7) and the last eight (Repetitions 12-19) presentations out of 20 were compared within each group. Younger adults showed similar levels of fMR-A in both repetition sets. Conversely, older adults did not show reliable fMR-A in Repetitions 1-7, but they did in Repetitions 12-19; subtracting the latter from the former revealed a significant effect within left inferior occipital, left lingual, and the posterior part of fusiform gyrus. We concluded that cortical responsiveness in older adults are compromised, but extensive repetition can lead older adults to show a delayed but closer level of fMR-A compared to younger adults.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-01-252012-09-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s11682-012-9148-5
PMID: 22274135
 Degree: -

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Title: Brain Imaging and Behavior
  Abbreviation : Brain Imaging Behav
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Secaucus, NJ : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 357 - 365 Identifier: Other: 1931-7557
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1931-7557