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  Effects of observing eye contact on gaze following in high-functioning autism

Böckler, A., Timmermans, B., Sebanz, N., Vogeley, K., & Schilbach, L. (2014). Effects of observing eye contact on gaze following in high-functioning autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(7), 1651-1658. doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2038-5.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-F413-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8207-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Böckler, Anne1, 2, Author              
Timmermans, Bert3, 4, Author
Sebanz, Natalie1, 5, Author
Vogeley, Kai3, 6, Author
Schilbach, Lenhard3, Author
Affiliations:
1Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
3University Hospital Cologne, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Cognitive Science, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary, ou_persistent22              
6Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Jülich, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Gaze following; Joint attention; Social cognition; High-functioning autism
 Abstract: Observing eye contact between others enhances the tendency to subsequently follow their gaze and has been suggested to function as a social signal that adds meaning to an upcoming action or event. The present study investigated effects of observed eye contact in high-functioning autism (HFA). Two faces on a screen either looked at or away from each other before providing congruent or incongruent gaze cues to one of two target locations. In contrast to control participants, HFA participants did not depict enhanced gaze following after observing eye contact. Individuals with autism, hence, do not seem to process observed mutual gaze as a social signal indicating the relevance of upcoming (gaze) behaviour. This may be based on the reduced tendency of individuals with HFA to engage in social gaze behavior themselves, and might underlie some of the characteristic deficiencies in social communicative behaviour in autism.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20142014-01-192014-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s10803-014-2038-5
PMID: 24442835
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
  Other : J. Autism Dev. Disord.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 44 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1651 - 1658 Identifier: ISSN: 0162-3257
CoNE: /journals/resource/954927545234