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  Different hemispheric roles in recognition of happy expressions

Nakamura, A., Maess, B., Knösche, T. R., & Friederici, A. D. (2014). Different hemispheric roles in recognition of happy expressions. PLoS One, 9(2): e88628. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088628.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-F5A5-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1507-E
Genre: Journal Article

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Nakamura_DifferentHemispheric.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
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© 2014 Nakamura et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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 Creators:
Nakamura, Akinori1, Author              
Maess, Burkhard2, Author              
Knösche, Thomas R.2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Methods and Development Group MEG and EEG - Cortical Networks and Cognitive Functions, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2205650              

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 Abstract: The emotional expression of the face provides an important social signal that allows humans to make inferences about other people’s state of mind. However, the underlying brain mechanisms are complex and still not completely understood. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we analyzed the spatiotemporal structure of regional electrical brain activity in human adults during a categorization task (faces or hands) and an emotion discrimination task (happy faces or neutral faces). Brain regions that are specifically important for different aspects of processing emotional facial expressions showed interesting hemispheric dominance patterns. The dorsal brain regions showed a right predominance when participants paid attention to facial expressions: The right parietofrontal regions, including the somatosensory, motor/premotor, and inferior frontal cortices showed significantly increased activation in the emotion discrimination task, compared to in the categorization task, in latencies of 350 to 550 ms, while no activation was found in their left hemispheric counterparts. Furthermore, a left predominance of the ventral brain regions was shown for happy faces, compared to neutral faces, in latencies of 350 to 550 ms within the emotion discrimination task. Thus, the present data suggest that the right and left hemispheres play different roles in the recognition of facial expressions depending on cognitive context.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-06-092014-01-142014-02-10
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0088628
PMID: 24520407
PMC: PMC3919788
Other: eCollection 2014
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (2) Sequence Number: e88628 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850