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  Catching eyes: Effects of social and nonsocial cues on attention capture

Böckler, A., van der Wel, R. P. R. D., & Welsh, T. N. (2014). Catching eyes: Effects of social and nonsocial cues on attention capture. Psychological Science, 25(3), 720-727. doi:10.1177/0956797613516147.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-1132-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7FDC-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Böckler, Anne1, 2, Author              
van der Wel, Robrecht P. R. D.3, Author
Welsh, Timothy N. 4, 5, Author
Affiliations:
1Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
3Department of Psychology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, University of Toronto, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              
5Centre for Motor Control, University of Toronto, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Attention; Cognition(s); Social cognition; Visual attention
 Abstract: Direct eye contact and motion onset are two powerful cues that capture attention. In the present study, we combined direct gaze with the sudden onset of motion to determine whether these cues have independent or shared influences. Participants identified targets presented randomly on one of four faces. Initially, two faces depicted direct gaze, and two faces depicted averted gaze. Simultaneously with or 900 ms before target presentation, one face with averted gaze switched to direct gaze, and one face with direct gaze switched to averted gaze. When gaze transitions and target presentation were simultaneous, the greatest response-time facilitation occurred at the location of the sudden onset of direct gaze. When target presentation was delayed, direct-gaze cues maintained a facilitatory influence, whereas motion cues induced an inhibitory influence. These findings reveal that gaze cues and motion cues at the same location influence information processing via independent and concurrently acting social and nonsocial attention channels.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-06-192013-11-022014-01-072014-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/0956797613516147
PMID: 24398595
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Psychological Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 25 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 720 - 727 Identifier: ISSN: 0956-7976
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/974392592005