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  A neural mechanism for recognizing speech spoken by different speakers

Kreitewolf, J., Gaudrain, E., & von Kriegstein, K. (2014). A neural mechanism for recognizing speech spoken by different speakers. NeuroImage, 91, 375-385. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.01.005.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-1467-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1488-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kreitewolf, Jens1, Author              
Gaudrain, Etienne2, 3, Author
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Research School of Behavioural and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Groningen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Glottal fold; Heschl's gyrus; Linguistic prosody; Voice
 Abstract: Understanding speech from different speakers is a sophisticated process, particularly because the same acoustic parameters convey important information about both the speech message and the person speaking. How the human brain accomplishes speech recognition under such conditions is unknown. One view is that speaker information is discarded at early processing stages and not used for understanding the speech message. An alternative view is that speaker information is exploited to improve speech recognition. Consistent with the latter view, previous research identified functional interactions between the left- and the right-hemispheric superior temporal sulcus/gyrus, which process speech- and speaker-specific vocal tract parameters, respectively. Vocal tract parameters are one of the two major acoustic features that determine both speaker identity and speech message (phonemes). Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that a similar interaction exists for glottal fold parameters between the left and right Heschl's gyri. Glottal fold parameters are the other main acoustic feature that determines speaker identity and speech message (linguistic prosody). The findings suggest that interactions between the left- and right-hemispheric areas are specific to the processing of different acoustic features of speech and speaker, and that they represent a general neural mechanism when understanding speech from different speakers.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-09-302014-01-032014-01-132014-05-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.01.005
PMID: 24434677
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 91 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 375 - 385 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166