English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Impact of mating behaviour on the success of malaria control through a single inundative release of transgenic mosquitoes

Boëte, C., Agusto, F. B., & Reeves, R. G. (2014). Impact of mating behaviour on the success of malaria control through a single inundative release of transgenic mosquitoes. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 347, 33-43. doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2014.01.010.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-7A45-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-7A46-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Boete_2014.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Boete_2014.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, MPLM; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Boëte, C., Author
Agusto, F. B., Author
Reeves, R. G.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Population Genetics, Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445646              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Malaria; mosquito; assortative mating; transgenics; vector-borne diseases
 Abstract: Transgenic mosquitoes are a potential tool for the control or eradication of insect-vectored diseases. For malaria, one possible strategy relies on the introduction of malaria-refractory transgenes into wild Anopheles mosquito populations that would limit their capacity to transmit the disease. The success of such an approach obviously depends on a variety of factors. By developing a model that integrates both population genetics and epidemiology, we explore how mosquito mating preferences and the cost and efficacy of refractoriness affects the long-term prevalence of malaria in humans subsequent to a single generation inundative release of male transgenic mosquitoes. As may be intuitively expected, mating discrimination by wild-type individuals against transgenic ones generally reduces the probability that transgenes become stably established at a high frequency in mosquito populations. We also show that in circumstances where transgenic individuals exhibit some degree of discrimination against wild-type individuals, this can favour the spread of refractory alleles and lead to a significant reduction in malaria prevalence in the human population (if the efficacy of a dominant refractory mechanism exceeds at least 75%). The existence of such a non-intuitive outcome highlights the practical value of increasing the understanding of Anopheles mating preferences in the wild as a means to harness them in the implementation of population replacement approaches. Potential strategies by which previously described mating preferences of Anopheles gambiae populations could be exploited to manipulate the mate choice of transgenic release stocks are discussed.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-01-072013-09-132014-01-15
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2014.01.010
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Theoretical Biology
  Other : J. Theor. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 347 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 33 - 43 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-5193 (print)
ISSN: 1095-8541 (online)
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922646048