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  The default modes of reading: Modulation of posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex connectivity associated with comprehension and task focus while reading

Smallwood, J., Gorgolewski, K. J., Golchert, J., Ruby, F. J. M., Engen, H. G., Baird, B., et al. (2013). The default modes of reading: Modulation of posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex connectivity associated with comprehension and task focus while reading. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7: 734. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2013.00734.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-84B2-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-85E8-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Smallwood, Jonathan1, Author              
Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.2, Author              
Golchert, Johannes2, Author              
Ruby, Florence J. M.1, Author              
Engen, Haakon G.3, Author              
Baird, Benjamin4, Author
Vinski, Melaina T.5, Author
Schooler, Jonathan W.4, Author
Margulies, Daniel S.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of York, Heslington, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356546              
3Department of Social Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Default mode network; Reading; Mind wandering; Self-generated thought; Comprehension; Posterior cingulate cortex; Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC)
 Abstract: Reading is a fundamental human capacity and yet it can easily be derailed by the simple act of mind-wandering. A large-scale brain network, referred to as the default mode network (DMN), has been shown to be involved in both mind-wandering and reading, raising the question as to how the same neural system could be implicated in processes with both costs and benefits to narrative comprehension. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) was used to explore whether the intrinsic functional connectivity of the two key midline hubs of the DMN—the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC)—was predictive of individual differences in reading comprehension and task focus recorded outside of the scanner. Worse comprehension was associated with greater functional connectivity between the PCC and a region of the ventral striatum. Better comprehension was associated with greater functional connectivity with a region of the right insula. By contrast reports of increasing task focus were associated with functional connectivity from the aMPFC to clusters in the PCC, the left parietal and temporal cortex, and the cerebellum. Our results suggest that the DMN has both costs (such as poor comprehension) and benefits to reading (such as an on-task focus) because its midline core can couple its activity with other regions to form distinct functional communities that allow seemingly opposing mental states to occur. This flexible coupling allows the DMN to participate in cognitive states that complement the act of reading as well as others that do not.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-08-152013-10-142013-11-12
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00734
PMID: 24282397
PMC: PMC3825257
Other: eCollection 2013
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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: 734 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: /journals/resource/1662-5161