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  A scaffold for efficiency in the human brain

Burzynska, A. Z., Garrett, D. D., Preuschhof, C., Nagel, I. E., Li, S.-C., Bäckman, L., et al. (2013). A scaffold for efficiency in the human brain. The Journal of Neuroscience, 33(43), 17150-17159. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1426-13.2013.

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 Creators:
Burzynska, Agnieszka Z.1, 2, Author
Garrett, Douglas D.1, 3, Author
Preuschhof, Claudia4, Author
Nagel, Irene E.4, Author
Li, Shu-Chen1, 5, Author
Bäckman, Lars6, Author
Heekeren, Hauke R.1, 4, 7, Author              
Lindenberger, Ulman1, Author
Affiliations:
1Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Education and Psychology, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, ou_persistent22              
7MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634548              

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 Abstract: The comprehensive relations between healthy adult human brain white matter (WM) microstructure and gray matter (GM) function, and their joint relations to cognitive performance, remain poorly understood. We investigated these associations in 27 younger and 28 older healthy adults by linking diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected during an n-back working memory task. We present a novel application of multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis that permitted the simultaneous modeling of relations between WM integrity values from all major WM tracts and patterns of condition-related BOLD signal across all GM regions. Our results indicate that greater microstructural integrity of the major WM tracts was negatively related to condition-related blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in task-positive GM regions. This negative relationship suggests that better quality of structural connections allows for more efficient use of task-related GM processing resources. Individuals with more intact WM further showed greater BOLD signal increases in typical “task-negative” regions during fixation, and notably exhibited a balanced magnitude of BOLD response across task-positive and -negative states. Structure—function relations also predicted task performance, including accuracy and speed of responding. Finally, structure–function–behavior relations reflected individual differences over and above chronological age. Our findings provide evidence for the role of WM microstructure as a scaffold for the context-relevant utilization of GM regions.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-09-062013-04-012013-09-162013-10-23
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1426-13.2013
PMID: 24155318
 Degree: -

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Title: The Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : J. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Baltimore, MD : The Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 33 (43) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 17150 - 17159 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925502187