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  Auditory stroop and absolute pitch: An fMRI study

Schulze, K., Mueller, K., & Koelsch, S. (2013). Auditory stroop and absolute pitch: An fMRI study. Human Brain Mapping, 34(7), 1579-1590. doi:10.1002/hbm.22010.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-8527-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-86BB-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Schulze, Katrin1, 2, Author              
Mueller, Karsten3, Author              
Koelsch, Stefan1, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neurocognition of Music, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634566              
2Institute of Child Health, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634558              
4Cluster Languages of Emotion, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Absolute pitch; Auditory perception; Auditory working memory; Auditory stroop; Superior temporal gyrus/sulcus
 Abstract: To date, the underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms of absolute pitch (AP) have remained elusive. In the present fMRI study, we investigated verbal and tonal perception and working memory in musicians with and without absolute pitch. Stimuli were sine wave tones and syllables (names of the scale tones) presented simultaneously. Participants listened to sequences of five stimuli, and then rehearsed internally either the syllables or the tones. Finally participants indicated whether a test stimulus had been presented during the sequence. For an auditory stroop task, half of the tonal sequences were congruent (frequencies of tones corresponded to syllables which were the names of the scale tones) and half were incongruent (frequencies of tones did not correspond to syllables). Results indicate that first, verbal and tonal perception overlap strongly in the left superior temporal gyrus/sulcus (STG/STS) in AP musicians only. Second, AP is associated with the categorical perception of tones. Third, the left STG/STS is activated in AP musicians only for the detection of verbal-tonal incongruencies in the auditory stroop task. Finally, verbal labelling of tones in AP musicians seems to be automatic. Overall, a unique feature of AP appears to be the similarity between verbal and tonal perception.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-09-262011-05-092011-11-152012-02-222013-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.22010
PMID: 22359341
Other: Epub 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 34 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1579 - 1590 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601686