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  Plastic behaviors in hosts promote the emergence of retaliatory parasites

Abou Chakra, M., Hilbe, C., & Traulsen, A. (2014). Plastic behaviors in hosts promote the emergence of retaliatory parasites. Scientific Reports, 4: 4251. doi:10.1038/srep04251.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-8A60-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0015-8A61-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Abou Chakra, Maria1, Author              
Hilbe, Christian1, Author              
Traulsen, Arne1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              

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Free keywords: coevolution; behavioural ecology; social evolution
 Abstract: Mafia like behavior, where individuals cooperate under the threat of punishment, occurs not only in humans, but is also observed in several animal species. Observations suggest that avian hosts tend to accept a certain degree of parasitism in order to avoid retaliating punishment from the brood parasite. To understand under which conditions it will be beneficial for a host to cooperate, we model the interaction between hosts and parasites as an evolutionary game. In our model, the host’s behavior is plastic, and thus, its response depends on the previous interactions with the parasite. We find that such learned behavior in turn is crucial for the evolution of retaliating parasites. The abundance of this kind of mafia behavior oscillates in time and does not settle to an equilibrium. Our results suggest that retaliation is a mechanism for the parasite to evade specialization and to induce acceptance by the host.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-01-212014-02-132014-03-04
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/srep04251
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 4 Sequence Number: 4251 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: /journals/resource/2045-2322