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  Reputational priors magnify striatal responses to violations of trust

Fouragnan, E., Chierchia, G., Greiner, S., Neveu, R., Avesani, P., & Coricelli, G. (2013). Reputational priors magnify striatal responses to violations of trust. The Journal of Neuroscience, 33(8), 3602-3611. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3086-12.2013.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0018-5160-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8661-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Fouragnan, Elsa1, Author
Chierchia, Gabriele1, Author              
Greiner, Susanne2, Author
Neveu, Remi3, Author
Avesani, Paolo2, Author
Coricelli, Giorgio1, 3, 4, Author
Affiliations:
1Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Italy, ou_persistent22              
2NeuroInformatics Laboratory (NILab), Bruno Kessler Foundation, Mattarello, Italy, ou_persistent22              
3Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Lyon, France, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Economics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Humans learn to trust each other by evaluating the outcomes of repeated interpersonal interactions. However, available prior information on the reputation of traders may alter the way outcomes affect learning. Our functional magnetic resonance imaging study is the first to allow the direct comparison of interaction-based and prior-based learning. Twenty participants played repeated trust games with anonymous counterparts. We manipulated two experimental conditions: whether or not reputational priors were provided, and whether counterparts were generally trustworthy or untrustworthy. When no prior information is available our results are consistent with previous studies in showing that striatal activation patterns correlate with behaviorally estimated reinforcement learning measures. However, our study additionally shows that this correlation is disrupted when reputational priors on counterparts are provided. Indeed participants continue to rely on priors even when experience sheds doubt on their accuracy. Notably, violations of trust from a cooperative counterpart elicited stronger caudate deactivations when priors were available than when they were not. However, tolerance to such violations appeared to be mediated by prior-enhanced connectivity between the caudate nucleus and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, which anticorrelated with retaliation rates. Moreover, on top of affecting learning mechanisms, priors also clearly oriented initial decisions to trust, reflected in medial prefrontal cortex activity.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-12-192012-06-292013-01-072013-02-20
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3086-12.2013
PMID: 23426687
 Degree: -

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Title: The Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : J. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 33 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3602 - 3611 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925502187_1