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  Dopaminergic Gene Polymorphisms Affect Long-term Forgetting in Old Age: Further Support for the Magnification Hypothesis

Papenberg, G., Bäckman, L., Nagel, I. E., Nietfeld, W., Schröder, J., Bertram, L., et al. (2013). Dopaminergic Gene Polymorphisms Affect Long-term Forgetting in Old Age: Further Support for the Magnification Hypothesis. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 25(4), 571-579. Retrieved from <Go to ISI>://WOS:000315580100006http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/jocn_a_00359?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed&.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0018-F9C4-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0018-F9C6-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Papenberg, G., Author
Bäckman, L., Author
Nagel, I. E., Author
Nietfeld, W.1, Author              
Schröder, J.1, Author
Bertram, L.2, Author              
Heekeren, Hauke R.3, Author              
Lindenberger, U., Author
Li, S. C., Author
Affiliations:
1Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1433550              
2Neuropsychiatric Genetics (Lars Bertram), Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1479655              
3MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634548              

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Free keywords: bdnf val66met polymorphism availability in-vivo episodic memory c957t polymorphism transporter gene intraindividual variability ser9gly polymorphism cognitive-abilities receptor agonists hippocampal ca1
 Abstract: Emerging evidence from animal studies suggests that suboptimal dopamine (DA) modulation may be associated with increased forgetting of episodic information. Extending these observations, we investigated the influence of DA-relevant genes on forgetting in samples of younger (n = 433, 20-31 years) and older (n = 690, 59-71 years) adults. The effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the DA D2 (DRD2) and D3 (DRD3) receptor genes as well as the DA transporter gene (DAT1; SLC6A3) were examined. Over the course of one week, older adults carrying two or three genotypes associated with higher DA signaling (i.e., higher availability of DA and DA receptors) forgot less pictorial information than older individuals carrying only one or no beneficial genotype. No such genetic effects were found in younger adults. The results are consistent with the view that genetic effects on cognition are magnified in old age. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to relate genotypes associated with suboptimal DA modulation to more long-term forgetting in humans. Independent replication studies in other populations are needed to confirm the observed association.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-02-282013
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: Other: WOS:000315580100006
ISSN: 0898-929X
URI: ://WOS:000315580100006http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/jocn_a_00359?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed&
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Title: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge, MA : MIT Press Journals
Pages: 9 Volume / Issue: 25 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 571 - 579 Identifier: ISSN: 0898-929X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/991042752752726