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  Unique mitochondrial DNA lineages in Irish stickleback populations: cryptic refugium or rapid recolonization?

Ravinet, M., Harrod, C., Eizaguirre, C., & Prodöhl, P. A. (2014). Unique mitochondrial DNA lineages in Irish stickleback populations: cryptic refugium or rapid recolonization? Ecology and Evolution, 4(12), 2488-2504. doi:10.1002/ece3.853.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-D7DD-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-D7E0-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Ravinet, Mark, Author
Harrod, Chris1, Author              
Eizaguirre, Christophe2, Author              
Prodöhl, Paulo A., Author
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1External, ou_persistent22              
2Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: ABC; anadromous fish; British Isles; phylogeographical hypothesis testing; statistical phylogeography
 Abstract: Repeated recolonization of freshwater environments following Pleistocene glaciations has played a major role in the evolution and adaptation of anadromous taxa. Located at the western fringe of Europe, Ireland and Britain were likely recolonized rapidly by anadromous fishes from the North Atlantic following the last glacial maximum (LGM). While the presence of unique mitochondrial haplotypes in Ireland suggests that a cryptic northern refugium may have played a role in recolonization, no explicit test of this hypothesis has been conducted. The three-spined stickleback is native and ubiquitous to aquatic ecosystems throughout Ireland, making it an excellent model species with which to examine the biogeographical history of anadromous fishes in the region. We used mitochondrial and microsatellite markers to examine the presence of divergent evolutionary lineages and to assess broad-scale patterns of geographical clustering among postglacially isolated populations. Our results confirm that Ireland is a region of secondary contact for divergent mitochondrial lineages and that endemic haplotypes occur in populations in Central and Southern Ireland. To test whether a putative Irish lineage arose from a cryptic Irish refugium, we used approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). However, we found no support for this hypothesis. Instead, the Irish lineage likely diverged from the European lineage as a result of postglacial isolation of freshwater populations by rising sea levels. These findings emphasize the need to rigorously test biogeographical hypothesis and contribute further evidence that postglacial processes may have shaped genetic diversity in temperate fauna.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-09-022013-09-062014-05-212014-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/ece3.853
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Title: Ecology and Evolution
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Wiley, PubMed Central
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 4 (12) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2488 - 2504 Identifier: ISSN: 2045-7758 (online)