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  Distinguishing neurocognitive processes reflected by P600 effects: Evidence from ERPs and neural oscillations

Regel, S., Meyer, L., & Gunter, T. C. (2014). Distinguishing neurocognitive processes reflected by P600 effects: Evidence from ERPs and neural oscillations. PLoS One, 9(5): e96840. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096840.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-EACE-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-802C-B
Genre: Journal Article

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© 2014 Regel et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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 Creators:
Regel, Stefanie1, Author              
Meyer, Lars1, Author              
Gunter, Thomas C.1, Author              
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1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634551              

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 Abstract: Research on language comprehension using event-related potentials (ERPs) reported distinct ERP components reliably related to the processing of semantic (N400) and syntactic information (P600). Recent ERP studies have challenged this well-defined distinction by showing P600 effects for semantic and pragmatic anomalies. So far, it is still unresolved whether the P600 reflects specific or rather common processes. The present study addresses this question by investigating ERPs in response to a syntactic and pragmatic (irony) manipulation, as well as a combined syntactic and pragmatic manipulation. For the syntactic condition, a morphosyntactic violation was applied, whereas for the pragmatic condition, such as “That is rich”, either an ironic or literal interpretation was achieved, depending on the prior context. The ERPs at the critical word showed a LAN-P600 pattern for syntactically incorrect sentences relative to correct ones. For ironic compared to literal sentences, ERPs showed a P200 effect followed by a P600 component. In comparison of the syntax-related P600 to the irony-related P600, distributional differences were found. Moreover, for the P600 time window (i.e., 500–900 ms), different changes in theta power between the syntax and pragmatics effects were found, suggesting that different patterns of neural activity contributed to each respective effect. Thus, both late positivities seem to be differently sensitive to these two types of linguistic information, and might reflect distinct neurocognitive processes, such as reanalysis of the sentence structure versus pragmatic reanalysis.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-02-152014-04-132014-05-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096840
PMID: 24844290
PMC: PMC4028180
Other: eCollection 2014
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (5) Sequence Number: e96840 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: /journals/resource/1000000000277850