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  Saccade reaction time asymmetries during task-switching in pursuit tracking

Bieg, H.-J., Bresciani, J.-P., Bülthoff, H., & Chuang, L. (2013). Saccade reaction time asymmetries during task-switching in pursuit tracking. Experimental Brain Research, 230(3), 271-281. doi:10.1007/s00221-013-3651-9.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-001A-1306-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-3DC4-E
Genre: Journal Article

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Bieg, H-J1, 2, Author              
Bresciani, J-P, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Chuang, LL1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: We investigate how smooth pursuit eye movements affect the latencies of task-switching saccades. Participants had to alternate their foveal vision between a continuous pursuit task in the display center and a discrete object discrimination task in the periphery. The pursuit task was either carried out by following the target with the eyes only (ocular) or by steering an on-screen cursor with a joystick (oculomanual). We measured participants’ saccadic reaction times (SRTs) when foveal vision was shifted from the pursuit task to the discrimination task and back to the pursuit task. Our results show asymmetries in SRTs depending on the movement direction of the pursuit target: SRTs were generally shorter in the direction of pursuit. Specifically, SRTs from the pursuit target were shorter when the discrimination object appeared in the motion direction. SRTs to pursuit were shorter when the pursuit target moved away from the current fixation location. This result was independent of the type of smooth pursuit behavior that was performed by participants (ocular/oculomanual). The effects are discussed in regard to asymmetries in attention and processes that suppress saccades at the onset of pursuit.

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 Dates: 2013-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00221-013-3651-9
BibTex Citekey: BiegBBC2013
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Title: Experimental Brain Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 230 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 271 - 281 Identifier: -