English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Rats maintain an overhead binocular field at the expense of constant fusion

Wallace, D., Greenberg, D., Sawinski, J., Rulla, S., Notaro, G., Kerr, J., et al. (2013). Rats maintain an overhead binocular field at the expense of constant fusion. Nature, 498(7452), 65-69. doi:10.1038/nature12153.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-001A-14F9-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-CA8B-A
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Wallace, DJ1, 2, 3, Author              
Greenberg, DS1, 2, 3, Author              
Sawinski, J1, 2, 3, Author              
Rulla, S1, 2, 3, Author              
Notaro, G1, 2, 3, Author              
Kerr, JND1, 2, 3, Author              
Kerr, Jason ND1, 2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Former Research Group Network Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528697              
3Research Group Neural Population Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497807              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Fusing left and right eye images into a single view is dependent on precise ocular alignment, which relies on coordinated eye movements. During movements of the head this alignment is maintained by numerous reflexes. Although rodents share with other mammals the key components of eye movement control, the coordination of eye movements in freely moving rodents is unknown. Here we show that movements of the two eyes in freely moving rats differ fundamentally from the precisely controlled eye movements used by other mammals to maintain continuous binocular fusion. The observed eye movements serve to keep the visual fields of the two eyes continuously overlapping above the animal during free movement, but not continuously aligned. Overhead visual stimuli presented to rats freely exploring an open arena evoke an immediate shelter-seeking behaviour, but are ineffective when presented beside the arena. We suggest that continuously overlapping visual fields overhead would be of evolutionary benefit for predator detection by minimizing blind spots.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2013-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/nature12153
BibTex Citekey: WallaceGSRNK2013
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Nature
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 498 (7452) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 65 - 69 Identifier: -