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  Human amygdala response to dynamic facial expressions of positive and negative surprise

Vrticka, P., Lorier, L., Bediou, B., & Sander, D. (2014). Human amygdala response to dynamic facial expressions of positive and negative surprise. Emotion, 14(1), 161-169. doi:10.1037/a0034619.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-001A-1A0C-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7EE6-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Vrticka, Pascal1, Author              
Lorier, Lara2, Author
Bediou, Benoît2, Author
Sander, David2, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Amygdala; Dynamic emotion; fMRI; Novelty; Relevance; Valence
 Abstract: Although brain imaging evidence accumulates to suggest that the amygdala plays a key role in the processing of novel stimuli, only little is known about its role in processing expressed novelty conveyed by surprised faces, and even less about possible interactive encoding of novelty and valence. Those investigations that have already probed human amygdala involvement in the processing of surprised facial expressions either used static pictures displaying negative surprise (as contained in fear) or “neutral” surprise, and manipulated valence by contextually priming or subjectively associating static surprise with either negative or positive information. Therefore, it still remains unresolved how the human amygdala differentially processes dynamic surprised facial expressions displaying either positive or negative surprise. Here, we created new artificial dynamic 3-dimensional facial expressions conveying surprise with an intrinsic positive (wonderment) or negative (fear) connotation, but also intrinsic positive (joy) or negative (anxiety) emotions not containing any surprise, in addition to neutral facial displays either containing (“typical surprise” expression) or not containing (“neutral”) surprise. Results showed heightened amygdala activity to faces containing positive (vs. negative) surprise, which may either correspond to a specific wonderment effect as such, or to the computation of a negative expected value prediction error. Findings are discussed in the light of data obtained from a closely matched nonsocial lottery task, which revealed overlapping activity within the left amygdala to unexpected positive outcomes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-02-012013-08-022013-11-112014-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/a0034619
PMID: 24219397
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

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Title: Emotion
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 14 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 161 - 169 Identifier: ISSN: 1528-3542
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1528-3542